SuperZeroes to the rescue in Chimera Theatre play

The play takes a comical look at less-useful super powers and what it means to be a hero

Brooke Ballum as Samuel Summers (right) shows off his homemade costume to friends Matt Norman (Daniel Ondang, middle) and Lily Leblanc (Jessica Buchanan, left). (Marlys Klossner/The Omega)

Brooke Ballum as Samuel Summers (right) shows off his homemade costume to friends Matt Norman (Daniel Ondang, middle) and Lily Leblanc (Jessica Buchanan, left). (Marlys Klossner/The Omega)

Chimera Theatre’s comedy SuperZeroes takes us to a near future in which society is organized into a class system based on superpowers, or lack thereof. The cast of characters we follow all have the willpower, but not necessarily the superpower to go with it.

For example, one of the characters cut from the show was a man who was 10 per cent bulletproof, which means his weakness was 90 per cent of bullets.

The kid-friendly show promises to be a hilarious and visually-entertaining play with lots of action scenes and fun costumes.

Superpowers can be a difficult thing to portray, especially onstage, where practical effects can only take you so far. The creative choreography of the scenes that do involve powers is engaging and as believable as can be in any superhero story.

Like most science fiction, the issues in the play draw a direct parallel to the struggle between economic classes that we see in real life, and pokes fun at it.

“There’s a lot of parallels that you can see in your day-to-day lives. It made it easier as an actor to imagine that because you just place it in society right now, so that was really cool in the character-building process,” said Shelyse Cameron, who plays powerless human Morgan Anderson.

Shelyse Cameron as Morgan Anderson takes Wyatt Purcha as Edwin Harris off guard. (Marlys Klossner/The Omega)

Shelyse Cameron as Morgan Anderson takes Wyatt Purcha as Edwin Harris off guard. (Marlys Klossner/The Omega)

Cameron’s character is part of a ragtag team that bucks the system including the ambitious Samuel Summers played by Brooke Ballam, who has a flair for the dramatic, and Lily Leblanc played by Jessica Buchanan, who comes from a line of super successful supers and wants to live up to her name. The play follows Summers as he monologues through life finding that being a hero is more about having character and determination than actual physical (or mental) abilities.

“It’s very visual and fast-paced. Not only do I demand acting from my actors, but they are also exhausted by the end of it. There’s so much movement and action and fighting. It’s awesome,” director Brittany MacCarthy said.