Variety of alternative sports on display at TCC

Chaos unfolds as the ball is nowhere to be seen during a game of bubble soccer. (Cameron Doherty/The Omega)

Chaos unfolds as the ball is nowhere to be seen during a game of bubble soccer. (Cameron Doherty/The Omega)

The Tournament Capital Centre gym was full of shouts of excitement this past Saturday as community members tried their hands at some new sports.

High jump, cup stacking, ping pong, fast pitch, floor hockey and tee ball stations were all available for people to try out, but most of the excitement was coming from the wheelchair basketball and the bubble soccer areas.

Wheelchair basketball offered participants the chance to roll out on to the court and try something that, while seemingly familiar, is completely different from what they were used to. Balls were raining down from everywhere and the loud clangs of wheel to wheel action could be heard throughout the gym.

The other main area of interest was the bubble soccer court. A variant of regular soccer, bubble soccer involves all of the players immersing their head and the upper half of their bodies in a large bubble of transparent plastic. The thing that appeared to be causing the most joy was the fact that bubble soccer is a full-contact sport. The soccer ball was often ignored completely with both teams taking the opportunity to run full speed into one another, sending them both flying in opposite directions, their plastic bubbles bouncing off the hardwood court.

A first-time wheelchair basketball player gets ready to shoot on Saturday Nov. 21. (Cameron Doherty/The Omega)

A first-time wheelchair basketball player gets ready to shoot on Saturday Nov. 21. (Cameron Doherty/The Omega)

“It was the best, even playing against the little kids. I had this one little guy, half my size, running into me and pushing me down,” said TRU Adventure Tourism student Tieg Friede.

The idea behind the event, which the Kamloops Adapted Sports Association helped put on, was to showcase some different sports for people and to help them learn new abilities. While the participants were mainly children, Tara Salm, who was working at the event, pointed out that everyone was having “so much fun, even the parents [were] trying it, which is the best.”