Broader horizons for new sorority

Alpha Phi Eta becomes TRU’s only internationally recognized sorority on campus

Alpha Phi Eta members Ariel Ceresney, Caitlin Burkeniuk, Kasahra Atkins and Martina Doucet above their street chalk ad. (Alexis Stockford/The Omega)

Alpha Phi Eta members Ariel Ceresney, Caitlin Burkeniuk, Kasahra Atkins and Martina Doucet above their street chalk ad. (Alexis Stockford/The Omega)

Women looking for Greek life on campus now have another option. TRU’s newest sorority, Alpha Phi Eta, recently became the university’s only internationally recognized sorority, joining 23 other chapters of the Kappa Beta Gamma sorority in North America.

“We decided to kind of hit the ground running, so to speak, and it kind of took off under our feet and became something even bigger than we had planned in such a short period of time,” Alpha Phi Eta co-founder Kasahra Atkins said.

The fledgling sorority has 12 members.

According Alpha Phi Eta member Ariel Ceresney, she had no interest in joining a sorority until this semester, but joined the new sorority out of friendship to Atkins.

“I had seen the tables for the other sorority and I just didn’t see much of an interest in it,” she said. “I don’t know. I didn’t get that great vibe from the girls, so I didn’t think I wanted to be involved in something like that, but knowing Caitlin and Kassy [Atkins] in other clubs, like Gamer Club going to play Werewolf every week, I figured they would be the kind of girls I would like to join and help them accomplish something like this.”

Co-founders Atkins and Caitlin Burneiuk founded Alpha Phi Eta this semester with the main goals of going international and getting involved with bigger community projects than TRU’s current sorority. Atkins added that they chose to join Kappa Beta Gamma, which was founded in 1917, for its history and values.

“As a sorority is all about sisterhood, it’s all about the connections and communication with people all over the place … We now have all of these women that we can call or go to or if we’re ever stuck somewhere, who are there to support us, so a huge thing about being in a sisterhood is having that support,” Atkins said.

TRU’s longstanding sorority, Zeta Beta Psi, says they are also applying to become internationally recognized, but hope to join the National Panhellenic Council, an international organization of sororities, as a separate entity.

While the new addition may be a potential rival for new recruits come September, Zeta president, Laura Howard, says she is excited to have another sorority on campus.

“I don’t see an issue with it. As the Zetas, we try to get out into the school and even out into the Kamloops community, but as two sororities, we can be more effective in that – showing students Greek life and, I don’t know, it gives more options. I think it’s better this way that we have two,” she said.