Off-campus resources on-hand to help out

Kamloops Museum and Archives home to local history, culture and more

Courtney Dickson, Arts & Entertainment Editor Ω

While the local museum is often a great place to get familiarized with the traditional culture and history of the community, there’s more these places have to offer. The Kamloops Museum and Archives is a neglected but great resource for students to gather research for projects and papers.

The Kamloops Museum and Archives, located on Seymour St. downtown, is good for more than just a day out with the grandparents. Kevin Skrepnek/The Omega

The Kamloops Museum and Archives, located on Seymour St. downtown, is good for more than just a day out with the grandparents. Kevin Skrepnek/The Omega

Archivist Robb Gilbert is on-hand to help anyone looking to access the archives. If the museum and archives doesn’t have what someone is looking for, Gilbert is able to find better-suited resources for whatever information is sought.

Gilbert recommends using memorybc.ca to access brief descriptions of archival holdings. Students (or anyone) can visit the archives between 1:15 and 4 p.m. from Tuesday to Friday, or make an appointment to meet with Gilbert.

Admission is entirely by donation, so whatever you can afford is what you pay to get in, as it is their mandate to make the museum accessible to all members of the community.

Those looking for a more relaxed visit can currently explore the second floor’s War of 1812 exhibit. The second floor they host three to four temporary exhibits per year that are generally more globally focused. Though these exhibits are meant to bring in knowledge about outside areas, the museum curator always tries to find a local connection.

“We really encourage the community to share their history,” said Melissa Baker, museum educator.

The third floor is dedicated to the history of the Kamloops area, starting with the Secwepemc (Shuswap) peoples. The British Columbia Fly Fishing Gallery and the Sid and Rhona Baker Mineral Collection are also located on this floor.

The first floor is designed for children to be able to participate in a variety of activities that will educate them about the history of Kamloops and the surrounding area. Baker said that not only do young families enjoy seeing their children having fun and learning new things, but it also gives them a space to interact with other members of the community and do something different.

“We have something for everyone,” Baker said.

They also do walking tours, including a haunted walking tour coming up at the end of October. If you’re interested in participating, reserve your spot soon, as Baker said these tours are selling out fast. Baker also mentioned they have adult-only walking tours, and they are labelled so because they talk about “women of the night.”